Monthly Archives: January 2014

Dreams and Bones: What I Learned From Pete Seeger

I woke up this morning to an e-mail from my sister, letting me know that Pete Seeger had died. Rebecca said, recalling one of his concerts: “After dorkily waiting for several minutes to shake his hand and tell him I … Continue reading

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Building the Internet of (Sustainable) Things

This morning I went to Challenge.gov’s 3rd anniversary celebration, at which they accepted this year’s Innovations in American Government Award from the Asch Center. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend included, in her list of awesome things to come out of federal challenges, … Continue reading

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Helpless at the Museum: What If You Don’t Feel Like Part of the Solution?

A few years ago—the internet tells me it was 2010—the Field Museum in Chicago put on a climate change exhibit. This was at the start of my career transition, and in fact I had just stopped working onva tenure portfolio … Continue reading

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Should Climate Communicators Get “On Message”?

Last week I went to a talk by Joe Romm—a really excellent evening discussing climate communication with a guy who has a fair amount of experience doing it right.  We got to see the trailer for Years of Living Dangerously, … Continue reading

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The Unfamiliar Apocalypse

The world has always been about to end.  When I was growing up, it was World War 3.  It was the most well-documented of modern wars, so we all knew the shape of the thing.  Someone would mistake a flock … Continue reading

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Why Green Minds?

In 2005, I was an assistant professor of psychology at a small midwestern tech school.  I was fascinated with the ways that we rewrite our perceptions of the world to fit our beliefs and expectations, to fit our memories into … Continue reading

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